#Save Rummo “Frittata di maccheroni”

Rummo pasta

#SAVE RUMMO

In October the town of Benevento (Italy) has been hit by a tremendous flood which has damaged the city and destroyed the Pasta Rummo factory.

Immediately, a chain of solidarity spread across social media. Using the hashtag #SaveRummo, a lot of users started to upload pictures of Pasta Rummo packaging on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to support the pasta factory.

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As pasta lovers (and as Italians),  we immediately tried to find a way to help this campaign, right here in Melbourne. In a few days, with the support of the Italian Consulate of Melbourne and Congafood  in collaboration with D.O.C Espresso and other Italian Restaurants in Melbourne, we started a project to support the city of Benevento and the Pasta Rummo factory; using their pasta for our recipes and promoting the Benevento gastronomy.

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LA FRITTATA DI MACCHERONI

La Fritta di Maccheroni (a frittata of pasta) is a typical dish in the region of Campania, South Italy, and very popular also in the town of Benevento.

It was originally a recipe for peasants, made by left over salumi, formaggi (cheeses) and pasta. You know when you have some spaghetti left over but not enough for a adequate dish? Well, la frittata di pasta is the recipe for you!

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Start to cook the spaghetti in boiling water. Don’t forget to add a pinch of salt once boiled.

Spaghetti Rummo recommends 9min of cooking time, so basically drain them after 6-7 minutes as they will finish cooking later. Save a cup of water you used for cooking.

Wash the spaghetti under running water and then let it rest in a bowl. Add the cup of water you saved.

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Meanwhile, in rough cubes, chop the culo (bottom) of the salami or prosciutto you have left over and  the cheese.

Now, how many eggs do you need?

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I could tell you that once my dad made a fritta di maccheroni with 36 eggs. But, in that occasion there where many people to feed. Let’s say that you will need 1 and 1/2 eggs per every 100g of pasta. Begin to beat the eggs with a fork.

In a big bowl mix the pasta (well drained), the salami, cheese cubes,

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the eggs, some formaggio parmigiano reggiano grattugiato (grated parmesan cheese), and mix. What are you doing with that fork?! Mix with the hands! In the cucina you need passion, you need to touch the food. To feel it.

Pour all of it into a greased pan. To grease the pan use olive oil. I’m not sure about butter as it is not very common, but if you have the sugna, the pork fat -USE IT. It is the best!

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Slow cook for five minutes than flip. But first pour on top an extra beaten egg. Let it cook for another five minutes. Turn back on the other side and let it cook until golden or to your desire.

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You may have it immediately, or have it once its cooled down.

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Italian tip: The pasta the day after is even better. You can eat this for a lunch break, packed for a picnic or a long trip. However, sharing it with a friend is the best way to enjoy it.

 

 

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